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Achieving the holy grail of 3-D painting

‘The Chair’ an Example of Dali’s Unprecedented Stereoscopic Work

Posted by Paul Chimera on July 20, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Double-Dali! Dali in 3-D! Double the pleasure!   In the 1970s, just when we might have thought Salvador Dali paintings couldn’t blow our minds any further – BAAM! – the Surrealist master and Catalan genius breaks exciting new ground by applying classic stereoscopy to modern sensibilities.   I was extremely excited and impressed when I became aware of Dali’s pushing the creative envelope in the ‘70s in exploring stereoscopic or

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rock-n-roll

Dali’s ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll’ Literally Rises from the Ashes!

Posted by Paul Chimera on July 17, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Tragedy and triumph descended upon perhaps the greatest series of oil paintings ever created by Salvador Dali: his “Seven Lively Arts” series commissioned by American impresario Billy Rose.   Rose bought the Ziefeld Theatre in New York and hired Dali to illustrate the theatre’s opening production. The Seven Lively Arts included opera, ballet, cinema, theatre, radio, art of the concert, and Boogie Woogie.   It has always been fascinating to

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Dali Painted a ‘Blue Dog’ Decades Before George Rodrigue Did!

Posted by Paul Chimera on July 10, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Salvador Dali may have anticipated an unlikely 1990s artistic phenomenon by more than five decades! This potentially astonishing fact reveals itself in his “Inventions of the Monsters” of 1937. I’ll get to the prescient details momentarily.   This 20-1/4 in. x 30-7/8 in. canvas is yet another of Dali’s “war pictures,” in that it was painted in anticipation of World War II.   The iconic burning giraffe motif, which

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‘Maximum Speed of Raphael’s Madonna’ is Maximum Dali!

Posted by Paul Chimera on July 07, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   One of the loveliest paintings from Salvador Dali’s vast catalog – combining Surrealism, Nuclear-Mysticism, Renaissance influences, and sheer beauty – is his “The Maximum Speed of Raphael’s Madonna” of 1954.   It strikes me that anyone who sort of wants it all in art is always well-served to enter the house of Dali, where virtually any style awaits you. In “Maximum Speed,” Dali has taken a classic portrait

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‘Portrait of Gala’ Shown Fading from Dali’s Life?

Posted by Paul Chimera on July 03, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Salvador Dali probably painted Gala more often than any other subject. She was virtually always painted in an exalted manner, often as a Madonna or angelic figure.   Consider her scrupulously noble and realistic image in “Assumpta Corpuscularia Lapislazulina.” Her reverent beauty in “Corpus Hypercubus.” Her Raphaelesque pose in “Virgin of Guadalupe.” Her conquering hero look on the banner in “Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus.” And her

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‘Portrait of My Dead Brother’ a Dali Show-Stopper in St. Pete!

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 29, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Salvador Dali died in 1903. The first Salvador Dali, that is.   Dali-the-artist’s life was preceded by the tragically brief life of his brother, who died at around age 3 of meningitis. Almost literally nine months later to the day, Dali the future titan of 20th century art was born in the town of Figueras, Spain.   Incredibly, his parents named him Salvador, too!   The significance of

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Do your dreams look like this?

‘Little Ashes’ a Quintessential Dali Dream Snapshot

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 26, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   “Little Ashes” of 1928 (also known as “Little Cinders”) is pure surrealism as Salvador Dali defined it best. The surrealists were determined to explore the subconscious world, the dream world – and here Dali has opened a window for us onto a moment in the endless film reel of his secret – yet public – life.   It has been suggested that the sleeping head at left represents Dali

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Bread loaf? Penis? Both?

Salvador Dali Knew How to Make a Bread Loaf Penis-like!

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 22, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Sometimes I believe scholars of the life and art of Salvador Dali overthink his surrealism. They ascribe profound meanings and esoteric psychoanalytic interpretations to aspects of his work that may or may not be plausible or necessary.   Me? I sometimes think Dali simply liked to shock. And, often, to be overtly sexual in the erotic and suggestive images that arose from many of his canvases – especially

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Reynolds Morse's favorite Dali

Unlikely Painting was Favorite of Dali’s Leading Patron

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 19, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   When I was director of publicity for the world’s first Salvador Dali Museum – then located in Beachwood, Ohio, near Cleveland and since relocated (in 1982) to St. Petersburg, Florida – one question was probably posed more often than any other to the collection’s owners, A. Reynolds and Eleanor Morse: which work in the collection is your favorite?   Mine is and always has been “The Hallucinogenic Toreador.”

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Morning arousal?

Think Sex: Dali’s ‘Morning Ossification of the Cypress’

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 15, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   There’s something quintessentially surrealist – and perhaps quintessentially Dalinian – about “Morning Ossification of the Cypress,” which a 30-year-old Salvador Dali painted in 1934. Ironically, the work is at once both strange and a bit eerie, yet also rather peaceful, devoid of a lot of elemental details that sometimes crowd confined spaces in Dali’s pictures.   At first blush, the painting certainly has a dream-like quality to it.

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