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A Dali war picture.

Is this Dali Painting the Most Unusually Titled of His Prodigious Output?

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 08, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   I don’t mean to dwell on so-called “war pictures”; I’ve written about several of them in recent blog posts. But today’s entry confronts a 1938 Dali painting that puts an exceptionally unusual twist on one’s anxiety over impending war – in this case the Spanish Civil War – and lays claim to one of the strangest titles of any Salvador Dali painting.   I’m talking about “Debris of

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Which parts are painted and which are collage??

‘First Days of Spring’ one of Dali’s Great Early Surrealist Gems!

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 05, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Salvador Dali’s “First Days of Spring,” painted when he was 25, seems to be “seasonally correct” (as opposed to politically correct) as we enjoy spring while on the cusp of the first days of of summer. It’s one of the rare Dali paintings that does NOT feature the mountains, cypress trees and rock formations from his beloved Spanish countryside, which populated so many of Dali’s works.   Instead, “First

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Dali Symbolized War through Giraffes on Fire!

Posted by Paul Chimera on June 01, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   One of the saddest realities of life is that history shows us there were very few if any times when war wasn’t a reality somewhere on our planet. Salvador Dali reflected this disquieting fact in a host of important works of art, beginning with his iconic oil on panel of 1935, “Flaming Giraffe” (Kuntsmuseum, Basel, Switzerland).   It’s funny how certain Dali paintings sometimes transport us back to

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A poignant cry for the artist's deceased mother.

Dali Paints a Dramatic Cry for His Deceased Mother

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 29, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   I’m not sure how many Dali scholars have connected the dots this way, but there’s really little wonder why the theme of death pervaded so much of the surrealism of Salvador Dali. First, the brother born a couple years before Dali – whom his parents had named Salvador (!) – died of meningitis.   A picture of the dead child hung prominently in the Dali family home, near

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Pieta, 1982

Dali’s ‘Pieta’ of 1982 Features Hidden Double-Image…His Final One?

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 25, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Today we’re taking a look at one of the final paintings by Salvador Dali, created in 1982 when the Surrealist master was 78 years old and in the throes of daunting health issues. Although we don’t know for certain, it’s probable that Dali had some help with this canvas by a studio assistant, given the increasing unsteadiness of Dali’s hand at the time. It seems fitting that Dali

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An LSD trip would likely make one believe mountains are moving!

Dali Imagines an LSD Trip in ‘Trippy’ 1967 Painting

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 22, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Here’s a Dali you’re more than likely not familiar with: “The Mountains of Cape Creus on the March (LSD Trip),” painted in 1967 at the height of the psychedelic, free love, acid-popping movement (not to mention the year this dali.com blogger graduated from high school).   “Mountains of Cape Creus on the March (LSD Trip)” – executed in watercolor and India ink – was painted the same year

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Sheer Beauty Underpins Dali’s ‘Galatea of the Spheres’

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 18, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   “Galatea of the Spheres” (1952) brings together in a single oil on canvas a number of influences that informed Salvador Dali’s work and set the direction of his art when he was in his late 40s.   For this blogger, first and foremost, we get to see Dali, the painter of beauty – an informal title he proclaimed in protest to the destructiveness he lamented was evident in

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Dali Paid Homage to Raphael in ‘Madonna of the Birds’

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 15, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   Salvador Dali was a wonderful watercolorist, and a great illustration of this is found in his “Madonna of the Birds” of 1945, in the The Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. This Dali painting is a clear nod to the Renaissance master Raphael, whom Dali always included when naming his top three favorite painters, probably in this order: Velasquez, Raphael, and Vermeer.   Dali was never afraid

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Dali’s ‘Royal Tiger’ a Departure Yet Still ‘Dalinian’!

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 11, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   There are a number of paintings by Salvador Dali that are something of a departure from what we’ve come to expect from the master of Surrealism. I think today’s look at the multi-faceted genius of Dali presents a great example of this: “Fifty Abstract Paintings which as Seen from Two Yards Change into Three Lenins Masquerading as Chinese and as Seen from Six Yards Appear as the Head

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rocks

‘Accidental’ Sighting Gives Birth to Dali’s ‘Paranoiac Face’

Posted by Paul Chimera on May 08, 2017
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By Paul Chimera Salvador Dali Historian   When we talk about an artist’s vision, we usually mean his or her sense of innovation or prescience. In the case of Salvador Dali, we also have to consider the concept of “vision” in a more literal sense – thanks to his unique Paranoiac-Critical creative method.   Put simply, the concept referred to Dali’s uncanny ability to see things that others did not – and successfully transcribe such visions

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